9 responses

  1. Steffaney Smith
    July 26, 2013

    Thank you for reviewing these books. I am a children’s librarian and you mention some of my favorites. I would add Maria Shriver’s “What is Heaven” and Michael Rosen’s “Sad Book.” It’s important to share these books before it becomes a more personal journey. A child will remember a book and find it again when it’s needed. I have found these books helpful for myself after my husband’s death.

    Reply

    • Erick
      March 3, 2017

      Hello Mrs. Smith I have been looking for a children’s book or it might be a book with short stories but the story i remember is about a wife and husband. When the wife passes away the husband is feeling a lot of grief and is very saddened that an angel comes to him and tells him that she will take him to heaven to see his wife but also tells him that she might not remember him. When the angel and husband get to heaven he finds his wife but just like the angel said she does’nt know who who he is and is scared. I do not remember much more but i have been looking for this for a while and if you know of it that would be great if you could respond. I read this in elementary back between 1987-1991.

      Reply

  2. Steffaney Smith
    July 26, 2013

    note my corrected email address: [email protected]

    Reply

  3. Hannah Jennings
    August 22, 2013

    Before Mom died, I wrote this post. http://www.couponingclass.com/to-everything-there-is-a-season/ She died on April 15, 2013. Arguably, one of the worst days ever- tax day, the day the Titanic sunk, Boston Marathon bombings… Mom. It was the day after my son’s 10th birthday. It still hurts like heck. THANK you for this list. I have been trying to find ways to talk about this with the kids. We push it away because, as you pointed out, crying and kids don’t mesh well. My babies are 6 and 10. They miss her SO much. I saved two of her sweat jackets (which smell like her) and I made them into teddy bears. They are sealed in plastic so they will still have her smell come Christmas. They say the worst part is when you pick up the phone to call her and she isn’t there anymore. No. The worst part is knowing she will never be there again. I would give anything to have spent more time with her. So if she is still here, sit with her and brush her hair. Tell her you love her. Tell her nothing will ever replace her. P.S. I went straight to depression too :). You are in good company. If you need to talk, I walked there. Sometimes there is only peace in knowing you aren’t alone. My Mom was only 52. Take care!

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    • Tara Ziegmont
      August 22, 2013

      Thank you so much for your kind words. Like my oldest, I don’t really want to talk about it. I know I should, but it’s so much easier to push it down and try to forget. Not a day goes by that I don’t think, “Oh, I should call Mum and ask her…”

      Reply

  4. Jessica McCord
    August 12, 2014

    My son died in a tragic accident & the last time my 4 year old saw him the ambulance was working on him. What would be the best grief book for him? I would welcome any suggestions

    Reply

    • Tara Ziegmont
      August 13, 2014

      I’m so sorry. I think most of the ones on this list would be good, but I would probably start with Heaven is For Real for Little Ones. (I don’t think it’s on the list; it may have been published after I wrote this.) But it’s really good and very comforting to small ones because it uses concrete language and explanations.

      Reply

      • Jessica McCord
        August 13, 2014

        Thank-you I will look for that book. He keeps telling us that the ambulance is still working on his baby & wants to know where heaven is

        Reply

  5. Sarah Wade
    August 7, 2019

    This is a book about the loss of a dog but it is a really good one. It’s called The Tenth Good Thing about Barney by Judith Viorst. https://amzn.to/2GT4Vze

    Reply

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