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Planting Seeds

Nearly ten years ago, I bought my home with a dilapidated swimming pool off the corner of the dilapidated back deck. I would have loved to have a swimming pool to splash around in, but there was tree growing through the bottom and the inner liner was missing. It would have been a giant money pit.

So my sister and I ripped the pool out. The year he moved in, Joe put in a garden in that spot.

The Garden

The first year, he planted tomatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, and cabbage. No one watered it while we were on our 10 day honeymoon, and thus the yield was meager.

The second year, our baby was born in June, so he planted a few tomato and zucchini plants and left it at that.

The third year, he planted zucchini, yellow squash, cucumbers, onions, chives, broccoli, sweet potatoes, white potatoes, carrots, green beans, and acorn squash. The cucumbers did pretty well, as did the potatoes. The rest didn’t do so well. The acorn squash yielded three whole squash – which were eaten by a rodent in the garage before we were able to eat them.

This Year’s Garden

This will be the fourth year. Because we’ve never had much success with our garden (does this make any sense?), Joe decided to start his plants from seeds this year.

He invested in one of those little plastic greenhouses with 72 wells, each containing one hard little peat pellet that swells up like a sponge on steroids when it gets wet.

He planted 2 seeds in each of the 72 wells, except for the acorn squash well (1 seed in that one because there was only one acorn squash seed) WInter Squash Medley

  • 6 wells of purple Sequoia garden green beans
  • 6 wells of Burpee’s Stringless Green pod garden green beans
  • 12 wells of Super Sugar Snap Peas
  • 6 wells of Burpee’s Fordhook Zucchini squash
  • 6 wells of yellow Pic-N-Pic Hybrid summer squash
  • 6 wells of Bush Champion Cucumbers
  • 12 wells of Detroit Supreme Dark Red beets

We also planted a Winter Squash Medley, which consisted of the seeds at the right. Incidentally, the package claims to contain 25% of each of 4 varieties. Does that look like 25% to you?

  • 6 pots of butternut squash
  • 1 acorn squash seed
  • 7 pots of spaghetti squash
  • 3 pots of lakota squash
  • 1 pot of mystery squash seeds

Joe has a few more things that he’d like to plant.

  • Dill
  • Leaf lettuce
  • Tomatoes (though he hasn’t picked a variety yet)

I think he’s going to have to expand his little garden plot.

Happily submitted to Tackle It Tuesday and Talk About Tuesday

© 2009 – 2018, Tara Ziegmont. All rights reserved.

25 thoughts on “Planting Seeds”

  1. Pingback: Planting Seeds | Feels Like Home | dankles.com
  2. I can not wait to start planting my gardens either…which reminds me I need to order the last of the seeds! Thanks for sharing!

    Christy’s last blog post..Tackle it Tuesday

  3. I sorely want to plant some seeds. I’m torn between doing the little wells like you, or starting in eggshells. I know the eggshells would be more cost efficient for us. I thought about starting spinach and lettuce in an old litterbox that we converted into a sunflower pot a couple of years ago (it has drainage so it would actually work.) Why is it we always do cucumbers and squash? Do we eat it that much? kwim? I think tomatoes and lettuce would be more well served for us this year- something we need to be eating more of.

    Wendy’s last blog post..Gratituesday 3-24

  4. I sorely want to plant some seeds. I’m torn between doing the little wells like you, or starting in eggshells. I know the eggshells would be more cost efficient for us. I thought about starting spinach and lettuce in an old litterbox that we converted into a sunflower pot a couple of years ago (it has drainage so it would actually work.) Why is it we always do cucumbers and squash? Do we eat it that much? kwim? I think tomatoes and lettuce would be more well served for us this year- something we need to be eating more of.

    Wendy’s last blog post..Gratituesday 3-24

  5. I will be planting my first garden this year as well. I plan on starting my seeds inside as well but since I’m in Minnesota, it’s still a bit early. Maybe in another month.

    MNKristy’s last blog post..Crafting Fun

  6. Sounds like he might need some more space for all that. We’ve never had much luck with anything but carrots and potatoes in our garden

    Stacey~ComfyMom’s last blog post..Tuesday Tribute – patient dental people

  7. I can not wait to start planting my gardens either…which reminds me I need to order the last of the seeds! Thanks for sharing!

    Christy’s last blog post..Tackle it Tuesday

  8. I agree. It’s so difficult to get things to grow in a massive variety, but it is definitely worth trying regardless!

  9. Sounds like he might need some more space for all that. We’ve never had much luck with anything but carrots and potatoes in our garden

    Stacey~ComfyMom’s last blog post..Tuesday Tribute – patient dental people

  10. I agree. It’s so difficult to get things to grow in a massive variety, but it is definitely worth trying regardless!

  11. Oh, you’ve hit on a love of mine! I live where it’s quite a bit warmer and so my garden is already moving right along. I’m cutting cilantro out of it daily, as well as tomatoes. I almost ALWAYS start my plants from seeds! My zuchini already have leaves that are over 4 inches long! They are such fast growers. I grow mine up a trellis, as I have limited ground space! I grow as many tomato varieties as I can, not so much on the squash! My lettuce and spinach are also doing quite well. I think I’ve got about 6 green peppers already growing (one is about an inch already). I just love being out in a garden. It’s so funny how differently your garden grows from year to year. It amazes me!
    Rebecca
    RootsAndWingsCo.blogspot.com

    RootsAndWingsCo.blogspot.com’s last blog post..Tuesdays With Dorie – Blueberry Crumble Muffins

  12. Oh, you’ve hit on a love of mine! I live where it’s quite a bit warmer and so my garden is already moving right along. I’m cutting cilantro out of it daily, as well as tomatoes. I almost ALWAYS start my plants from seeds! My zuchini already have leaves that are over 4 inches long! They are such fast growers. I grow mine up a trellis, as I have limited ground space! I grow as many tomato varieties as I can, not so much on the squash! My lettuce and spinach are also doing quite well. I think I’ve got about 6 green peppers already growing (one is about an inch already). I just love being out in a garden. It’s so funny how differently your garden grows from year to year. It amazes me!
    Rebecca
    RootsAndWingsCo.blogspot.com

    RootsAndWingsCo.blogspot.com’s last blog post..Tuesdays With Dorie – Blueberry Crumble Muffins

  13. You should have him do research on How to plant and care for each of the plants. The search be worded ‘ How to plant and care for Tomato’s’ for example. Different plants need a different amount of room to grow. Some plants need additives to the soil. Tomato’s like Calcium. Tomato’s like to be watered twice a day if the temperature is over 88 degrees. Many beans will drop their blossoms when temperature begin getting around 92 degrees.
    If your plants like Tomatoes, squash, peppers, apples, apricots get a disorder known as blossom-end rot it can either be caused by a Calcium deficiency or in some cases a lack of water. In cooler weather sometimes watering can be spaced two days apart. Some people tear up newspaper into small pieces and place into the bottom of the hole that they are planting their tomatoes in to help retain moisture, and they also place straw or several layers of newspaper over the soil and around plants to provide valuable insulation and hold in moisture. Just make sure the paper is at least 1 inch out and away from the stalk of the plant. Some plants do not do well with transplantation and therefore should be sown directly into the garden. These include: corn, beans, cucumbers, cantaloupe, pumpkin, peas, squash, and watermelon. Even though I have read this information, I have still started some green beans, cucumbers, cantaloupe, squash and watermelon inside. I am going to try and transplant them when the weather gets warm, because I felt I did not have a long enough growing season last year where I live. I live in Colorado. Does your husband compost? Does he add it into the soil? I usually buy additives for my soil, instead of trying to compost. In the past all composting did was encourage mice and rabbits to hang around. I didn’t like that one bit, so I don’t do it anymore. Garden soil should be prepared prior to planting seeds. It should be tilled and organic matter added. Incorporate a 3-4 inch layer of the organic matter into at least the top 12 inches of the garden soil. Mixing in 2 pounds of ammonium phosphate in the ratio of 12-20-0 or a similar analysis fertilizer for every 100 square feet of garden area is a good start for vegetable/fruit gardens. Organic fertilizers such as fish meal, bone meal, and blood meal may also be incorporated as needed, just read the container instructions. Several days before planting water the soil thoroughly.
    Plant seeds or plants at the depth and spacing called for on the seed packets or plant containers (if you germinate and pre-start your plants inside, you may need to refer to a Gardening Encyclopedia at your local Library, or ask a garden shop expert for such info planting
    tips). Onions bulbs are hardy down to 20 degrees so these can be put in the garden early. It’s definitely worth buying onion bulbs over onion seeds if you want big onions and you freeze them. Onions prefer to be planted on a bed mounded or raised up about 4 inches high and about 20 inches wide. The rows should be 10 inches apart and there should always be two rows. Onions need full sun. The furrow between the rows should be about 4 inches deep. In the furrow bottom scatter a phosphorous rich fertilizer, e.g. ammonium phosphate in the ratio of 12-20-0. Evenly spread about one third to one half cup of fertilizer for about every 9-10 foot row. Phosphorous helps to increase the growth and size of the onions. Do not add sulfur to the onion soil. Many vegetables like sulfur, but not onions. All sulfur does to onions is make them become very hot tasting. It will ruin a sweet onion’s (Vadalia) taste. Before planting cover the fertilizer with up to 2-3 inches of regular top soil. The closer to harvest the more water the onion plants will need. It’s best to plant onion bulbs as soon as you can after purchasing them. Onions need ammonium nitrate regular fertilization too. Apply a 1/3 to 1/2 cup of nitrogen based fertilizer for every 9-10 foot row of onions. Scatter the fetilizer and lightly scratch it into the top of the soil. After fertilizing make sure to apply water to soak the fertilizer into the soil. The first nitrogen application should not be made until about three weeks after planting, so the plant will not be burned by it. Continue fertilizing with the nitrogen about every 3 weeks and discontinue when the neck of the onion (just above the bulb) begins feeling soft.
    Every time you fertilize it must be followed by a thorough watering.
    As the onion bulbs develop, loosen the soil around the expanding bulbs to allow them to continue growing. Do not cut too far into the soil or too close to the bulb, which would cause damage and may inhibit future growing. When the bulb grows it expands up and outward. It’s important not to cover the bulb with soil as it begins to start exposing above ground. At harvest time almost half of the bulb may actually be seen above the soil. This is normal.
    Maturing onions have leaves beginning to fall over at the base area. As this is seen happening it is an indication to reduce watering. The tops of the leaves will start turning brown. This is normal at that time, and it indicates the onions are ready for harvest.
    Note sweet onions do not store as long as other types of bulb onions because they have a higher moisture content. Harvested onions should remain dry and not touch one another.
    One commonly used method of accomplishing this is to use a nylon stocking. Tie a knot between each onion that is dropped into the onion to keep them from touching. Keep the stocking in a cool dry location in hanging fashion. Remove onions from bottom of stocking by cutting one knot open at a time.
    Onions should last a month or two this way.
    I however like to cook my onions in with my summer squash along with a little garlic and olive oil and freeze it freezer bags. We like to eat this squash/onion/garlic mixture instead of potato’s or rice. How do I prepare this, well I make the sure the summer squash are small, and the skins have not yet become tough. I will pull about 8 off the plants. I slice them into about 1/4 inch slices (discarding the very end pieces), then I chop up 1 large peeled onion and 2 peeled cloves of garlic that are chopped. In a large pan (dutch oven works great) I heat 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil. I add in the summer squash and stir often on medium high heat until the squash skin has lightly browned and the squash has begun to soften (but not mushy), add in the onion and garlic and continue heating just until they get slightly carmelized. Then remove from heat, let cool and place in freezer bags in portion amounts appropriate for your family. Freeze. This should last in the freezer easily for at least 3 months. I used some from my freezer as old as 5 months without any change in taste quality or texture. You just heat it back up in a frying or sauce pan, or even the microwave, after removing from the package.
    Herbs are great you can plant several varieties in a space as small as 5 square feet. I’m only planting Dill so far this year, but trying to talk hubby into letting me buy more herb seeds.
    I like to make this recipe: Cucumber, Onion, Dill salad.
    You use Cucumbers that are peeled, seeded, and cut into halved slices, peeled sliced onions cut into ring like fashion and Fresh Dill chopped up (amount to be determined by you, but the more Dill, the Dillier it tastes, I like 1 tablespoon of chopped dill) put in a bowl along with equal parts of Vinegar of choice and water (e.g. 1 cup Red Wine Vinegar and 1 cup water). Salt and Pepper to taste. Let set in refrigerator about 3 or more hours, stir at least 1 hour to incorporate the flavors). A small amount of olive oil can be added in, if you desire, but we don’t add the olive oil to this recipe at my house.
    Herbs are also easy to grow in pots. I might grow the dill in a pot instead of in the garden.
    I’m growing cabbage this year so dilled cabbage is also a tasty treat.
    I’m going to grow one Zucchini squash not because my family likes it to much, but because a girl friend of mine family’s likes it. The only way my family will eat it, is if I pick them when they are really small and treat them much like a cucumber, by peeling them, seeding them and slicing them up in a garden salad. We don’t like zucchini bread at all. Yellow summer squash needs a soil that’s has lots of organic matter in it. The soil should be loosened to at least 18 inches in depth. This is one vegetable that likes the sulfur, so keep it away from the onions. For every 100 feet of summer squash you’ll need to mix in 2 pounds of ammonium phosphate or other vegetable garden type fertilizer and about 5 pounds of woil sulfur for that same area. So just do the divisional math on the amounts if your garden area devoted to squash if less than 100 feet. Of course summer squash needs alot of growing room, at least 2 feet apart, but 3 feet is even better.

    Squash along with melons and cucumbers develop both male and female flowers on the same plant. So in order for fruit to develop on them, pollen must be transferred from the male to female flowers. You can hand pollinate these vegetables/fruits to ensure fruit development. When flowers develop, look at the flower base. Female flowers have the presence of a miniature fruit (ovary) at the base of the flower. Male flowers have a long splender stem. Female flowers have short stems. Use a small soft artist paint brush. Remove with the brush the yellow pollen from the male flower and brush it on the stigma center of the female flower. Remember when hand-pollinating use only freshly opened flowers. Flowers on these plants open early in the morning and are receptive to the pollen for only one day. Yes, Bees and other insects can pollinate too, but if you have a big garden sometimes it’s nice to do some of the pollinating to insure a larger crop harvest.
    Note all the early flowers when first growing are males, the females will show up too, but you have to be alittle patient for maybe a week or two.
    Well there’s lots of info out there on the internet by experts and the info is for free.
    A good way is to print it out and put it in a notebook so you can refer to it as needed, and index it with tabs so you can go to the right plant as needed.
    There are some plant varieties that don’t grow well side by side, mostly because of what the soil needs added, so just look and see if any of the experts have tips.
    I love to freeze fruits and vegetables, it certainly offsets grocery costs in the winter.
    The water doesn’t cost as much as produce does in the winter time, anyways where I live it doesn’t.
    If you’ve had a garden for many years and the soil is in good shape you may find you have to add less fertilizers in following years to still get good results.
    It’s also good to have a couple of metal rods standing up in the garden to possibly take small lightening hits. Lightening hits to garden soil re-energizes them. You should let the land rest every 7th year, that means no garden in that area every 7th year, so the soil can rest and reabsorb nutrients from the rain, snow, sun etc…
    Well just a few tips for your Husband.
    I love to Garden can you tell.

  14. You should have him do research on How to plant and care for each of the plants. The search be worded ‘ How to plant and care for Tomato’s’ for example. Different plants need a different amount of room to grow. Some plants need additives to the soil. Tomato’s like Calcium. Tomato’s like to be watered twice a day if the temperature is over 88 degrees. Many beans will drop their blossoms when temperature begin getting around 92 degrees.
    If your plants like Tomatoes, squash, peppers, apples, apricots get a disorder known as blossom-end rot it can either be caused by a Calcium deficiency or in some cases a lack of water. In cooler weather sometimes watering can be spaced two days apart. Some people tear up newspaper into small pieces and place into the bottom of the hole that they are planting their tomatoes in to help retain moisture, and they also place straw or several layers of newspaper over the soil and around plants to provide valuable insulation and hold in moisture. Just make sure the paper is at least 1 inch out and away from the stalk of the plant. Some plants do not do well with transplantation and therefore should be sown directly into the garden. These include: corn, beans, cucumbers, cantaloupe, pumpkin, peas, squash, and watermelon. Even though I have read this information, I have still started some green beans, cucumbers, cantaloupe, squash and watermelon inside. I am going to try and transplant them when the weather gets warm, because I felt I did not have a long enough growing season last year where I live. I live in Colorado. Does your husband compost? Does he add it into the soil? I usually buy additives for my soil, instead of trying to compost. In the past all composting did was encourage mice and rabbits to hang around. I didn’t like that one bit, so I don’t do it anymore. Garden soil should be prepared prior to planting seeds. It should be tilled and organic matter added. Incorporate a 3-4 inch layer of the organic matter into at least the top 12 inches of the garden soil. Mixing in 2 pounds of ammonium phosphate in the ratio of 12-20-0 or a similar analysis fertilizer for every 100 square feet of garden area is a good start for vegetable/fruit gardens. Organic fertilizers such as fish meal, bone meal, and blood meal may also be incorporated as needed, just read the container instructions. Several days before planting water the soil thoroughly.
    Plant seeds or plants at the depth and spacing called for on the seed packets or plant containers (if you germinate and pre-start your plants inside, you may need to refer to a Gardening Encyclopedia at your local Library, or ask a garden shop expert for such info planting
    tips). Onions bulbs are hardy down to 20 degrees so these can be put in the garden early. It’s definitely worth buying onion bulbs over onion seeds if you want big onions and you freeze them. Onions prefer to be planted on a bed mounded or raised up about 4 inches high and about 20 inches wide. The rows should be 10 inches apart and there should always be two rows. Onions need full sun. The furrow between the rows should be about 4 inches deep. In the furrow bottom scatter a phosphorous rich fertilizer, e.g. ammonium phosphate in the ratio of 12-20-0. Evenly spread about one third to one half cup of fertilizer for about every 9-10 foot row. Phosphorous helps to increase the growth and size of the onions. Do not add sulfur to the onion soil. Many vegetables like sulfur, but not onions. All sulfur does to onions is make them become very hot tasting. It will ruin a sweet onion’s (Vadalia) taste. Before planting cover the fertilizer with up to 2-3 inches of regular top soil. The closer to harvest the more water the onion plants will need. It’s best to plant onion bulbs as soon as you can after purchasing them. Onions need ammonium nitrate regular fertilization too. Apply a 1/3 to 1/2 cup of nitrogen based fertilizer for every 9-10 foot row of onions. Scatter the fetilizer and lightly scratch it into the top of the soil. After fertilizing make sure to apply water to soak the fertilizer into the soil. The first nitrogen application should not be made until about three weeks after planting, so the plant will not be burned by it. Continue fertilizing with the nitrogen about every 3 weeks and discontinue when the neck of the onion (just above the bulb) begins feeling soft.
    Every time you fertilize it must be followed by a thorough watering.
    As the onion bulbs develop, loosen the soil around the expanding bulbs to allow them to continue growing. Do not cut too far into the soil or too close to the bulb, which would cause damage and may inhibit future growing. When the bulb grows it expands up and outward. It’s important not to cover the bulb with soil as it begins to start exposing above ground. At harvest time almost half of the bulb may actually be seen above the soil. This is normal.
    Maturing onions have leaves beginning to fall over at the base area. As this is seen happening it is an indication to reduce watering. The tops of the leaves will start turning brown. This is normal at that time, and it indicates the onions are ready for harvest.
    Note sweet onions do not store as long as other types of bulb onions because they have a higher moisture content. Harvested onions should remain dry and not touch one another.
    One commonly used method of accomplishing this is to use a nylon stocking. Tie a knot between each onion that is dropped into the onion to keep them from touching. Keep the stocking in a cool dry location in hanging fashion. Remove onions from bottom of stocking by cutting one knot open at a time.
    Onions should last a month or two this way.
    I however like to cook my onions in with my summer squash along with a little garlic and olive oil and freeze it freezer bags. We like to eat this squash/onion/garlic mixture instead of potato’s or rice. How do I prepare this, well I make the sure the summer squash are small, and the skins have not yet become tough. I will pull about 8 off the plants. I slice them into about 1/4 inch slices (discarding the very end pieces), then I chop up 1 large peeled onion and 2 peeled cloves of garlic that are chopped. In a large pan (dutch oven works great) I heat 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil. I add in the summer squash and stir often on medium high heat until the squash skin has lightly browned and the squash has begun to soften (but not mushy), add in the onion and garlic and continue heating just until they get slightly carmelized. Then remove from heat, let cool and place in freezer bags in portion amounts appropriate for your family. Freeze. This should last in the freezer easily for at least 3 months. I used some from my freezer as old as 5 months without any change in taste quality or texture. You just heat it back up in a frying or sauce pan, or even the microwave, after removing from the package.
    Herbs are great you can plant several varieties in a space as small as 5 square feet. I’m only planting Dill so far this year, but trying to talk hubby into letting me buy more herb seeds.
    I like to make this recipe: Cucumber, Onion, Dill salad.
    You use Cucumbers that are peeled, seeded, and cut into halved slices, peeled sliced onions cut into ring like fashion and Fresh Dill chopped up (amount to be determined by you, but the more Dill, the Dillier it tastes, I like 1 tablespoon of chopped dill) put in a bowl along with equal parts of Vinegar of choice and water (e.g. 1 cup Red Wine Vinegar and 1 cup water). Salt and Pepper to taste. Let set in refrigerator about 3 or more hours, stir at least 1 hour to incorporate the flavors). A small amount of olive oil can be added in, if you desire, but we don’t add the olive oil to this recipe at my house.
    Herbs are also easy to grow in pots. I might grow the dill in a pot instead of in the garden.
    I’m growing cabbage this year so dilled cabbage is also a tasty treat.
    I’m going to grow one Zucchini squash not because my family likes it to much, but because a girl friend of mine family’s likes it. The only way my family will eat it, is if I pick them when they are really small and treat them much like a cucumber, by peeling them, seeding them and slicing them up in a garden salad. We don’t like zucchini bread at all. Yellow summer squash needs a soil that’s has lots of organic matter in it. The soil should be loosened to at least 18 inches in depth. This is one vegetable that likes the sulfur, so keep it away from the onions. For every 100 feet of summer squash you’ll need to mix in 2 pounds of ammonium phosphate or other vegetable garden type fertilizer and about 5 pounds of woil sulfur for that same area. So just do the divisional math on the amounts if your garden area devoted to squash if less than 100 feet. Of course summer squash needs alot of growing room, at least 2 feet apart, but 3 feet is even better.

    Squash along with melons and cucumbers develop both male and female flowers on the same plant. So in order for fruit to develop on them, pollen must be transferred from the male to female flowers. You can hand pollinate these vegetables/fruits to ensure fruit development. When flowers develop, look at the flower base. Female flowers have the presence of a miniature fruit (ovary) at the base of the flower. Male flowers have a long splender stem. Female flowers have short stems. Use a small soft artist paint brush. Remove with the brush the yellow pollen from the male flower and brush it on the stigma center of the female flower. Remember when hand-pollinating use only freshly opened flowers. Flowers on these plants open early in the morning and are receptive to the pollen for only one day. Yes, Bees and other insects can pollinate too, but if you have a big garden sometimes it’s nice to do some of the pollinating to insure a larger crop harvest.
    Note all the early flowers when first growing are males, the females will show up too, but you have to be alittle patient for maybe a week or two.
    Well there’s lots of info out there on the internet by experts and the info is for free.
    A good way is to print it out and put it in a notebook so you can refer to it as needed, and index it with tabs so you can go to the right plant as needed.
    There are some plant varieties that don’t grow well side by side, mostly because of what the soil needs added, so just look and see if any of the experts have tips.
    I love to freeze fruits and vegetables, it certainly offsets grocery costs in the winter.
    The water doesn’t cost as much as produce does in the winter time, anyways where I live it doesn’t.
    If you’ve had a garden for many years and the soil is in good shape you may find you have to add less fertilizers in following years to still get good results.
    It’s also good to have a couple of metal rods standing up in the garden to possibly take small lightening hits. Lightening hits to garden soil re-energizes them. You should let the land rest every 7th year, that means no garden in that area every 7th year, so the soil can rest and reabsorb nutrients from the rain, snow, sun etc…
    Well just a few tips for your Husband.
    I love to Garden can you tell.

  15. Sorry I made some mistakes in my typing above, I must be getting sleepy.
    The info about the onions. Drop an onion into the nylon stocking, then knot, next drop in another onion then knot and so forth. Not drop an onion into an onion.
    About the Cucumber/Onion/Dill Salad, stir once every hour for 3 hours, not stir at least one hour to incorporate the flavors.
    Sorry about all my other grammer and spelling mistakes. Boy I made a ton. Think I need to go to sleep.

  16. Sorry I made some mistakes in my typing above, I must be getting sleepy.
    The info about the onions. Drop an onion into the nylon stocking, then knot, next drop in another onion then knot and so forth. Not drop an onion into an onion.
    About the Cucumber/Onion/Dill Salad, stir once every hour for 3 hours, not stir at least one hour to incorporate the flavors.
    Sorry about all my other grammer and spelling mistakes. Boy I made a ton. Think I need to go to sleep.

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